About the Site

September 12th, 2013 Leave a comment Go to comments

Keacher.com is the online journal of Jeff Keacher.

In years past, he went on a road trip to every American state and Canadian province to play hockey in each one of them, developed a photo deblurring tool called Blurity, founded (and later sold) BonnevilleClub.com, drew the webcomic Zoitz, and worked as a part-time photojournalist.

Jeff has a master of science degree in management science and engineering from Stanford University.  He also holds a bachelor of science degree in electrical engineering from Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology.

Between Rose-Hulman and Stanford, he worked for three years as a software engineer for Medtronic Neuromodulation in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

These days, Jeff lives in Denver, Colorado, where he enjoys road cycling, mountain biking, baking, skiing, and playing ice hockey as a goalie. He consults in the areas of medical device software and computational photography, and he continues to develop and sell Blurity.

You may contact Jeff at jeff.keacher@gmail.com

  1. June 26th, 2012 at 10:53 | #1

    Jeff, Really nice project – I REALLY like your views – I am always searching for new programs and innovations. I have some ideas that may get this guy rolling and might even have some resources to get it out there. Drop me a note….

  2. Md.Ali khoja
    December 14th, 2013 at 02:52 | #2

    very nice keacher. good information for the begginer start right here for something techie. keep it up

  3. Regula Keller
    April 8th, 2014 at 10:04 | #3

    Dear Jeff
    I like your project that connected an old MAC to the internet: It is both crazy and brilliant! I am at the moment also trying to find a solution for a seemingly impossible task and just boldly ask you if you could help me in any way (new project?!):
    My professor saved data on old 40 MB Tape Cartridges (produced by 3M. Label: Formatted DC 2000 1/4-inch tape (6.35 mm) 205 feet (62.5m) 12,500 ftpi (compatible systems: Adic, Apple, Mirror, Seagate). DC 051111 12511). This MAC data backup system was common at that time (1990). We even have the reading device, but the drive wheel melted when we tried to use it. If we knew the size and the tolerance of this wheel, we could probably repair the reading device.
    Is there any tip or advice you could give us?
    Thanks you, Reggie